Booklist: Beach Reads for Kids, Shared Reading with Children

Booklist: Beach Reads for Kids, Shared Reading with Children

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Booklist: Beach Reads for Kids, Shared Reading with Children

Planning a trip to the beach with your family? Be sure to pack a few of these beach read books for the day.

Beach reads are typically those books from your to be read pile that you save for down time on vacations. Some favorite beach read genres are adventures, romances, and other light reading that takes you away from your daily routine. Beach reads to share with your children are beach and ocean themed books. Read these books together to build family traditions, enhance travel time, and/or create a knowledge base for young children. Most of all beach reads for shared reading are fun books for your family. Use these beach reads to start conversations with your child.

Before you leave on your trip be sure to share with your children Elise Parsley’s If You Ever Want to Bring a Piano to the Beach, Don’t!  This book is sure to ease the inevitable negotiations on what to pack and what not to pack for your family’s day at the beach. Just be sure to pack a few extra large zip top plastic bags for safely transporting your books!

Before Shared Reading with Children

For young children, reading a book about a trip to the beach can provide them an introduction to a new experience. Even if your family does not visit a beach, a book about playing on the beach can provide ideas for sandbox play, water play, and spark creative use for other sensory materials like sea shells or boat and float toys.

During Shared Reading with Children

Talk with your child during the shared reading. When talking with young children use Child Directed Language (CDL). Child Directed Language includes raising the pitch of your voice and having a rhythmic cadence for your speech while maintaining eye contact with your child. It also substitutes simpler vocabulary or even recognizable sounds for more difficult or longer words. Examples include onomatopoeia — “tick tock” for the word “clock” or “time” and using fewer syllables or more descriptive phrases — “train” or “choo choo” instead of “locomotive engine.” Most of all, Child Directed Language builds in expectation and time for responses from the child. There is a give and take. Make it a two-way exchange of communication with your child, like a volleyball passing from team to team instead of a batter hitting a ball to a fielder. This way a foundation for shared communication is built instead of merely a quiz situation between the adult and child.

Child Directed Language by Age Groups

For babies, when reading use the “point — label — pause” technique. This will provide a pattern, so when your child is able to vocalize and/or repeat single words they will have a structure for learning new vocabulary from the pictures.

For toddlers, point out the sequence of events for the story. This will build the awareness that stories have steps that they follow that are logical and time-ordered. You can do this by reviewing what just happened on the previous page(s) — predicting what might happen next — then discussing if the prediction was correct.

For preschoolers, point out cause and effect in stories.  Preschoolers are learning how to understand plot. They can work on identifying how the character’s actions affect the story — bringing a piano to the beach creates problems that are not fun.

Older children can bring in prior knowledge and experience to conversations about the books by adding facts or background experiences to the story (“remember when we …”). Older children can also compare and contrast observations of characters’ actions, intentions, and actual outcomes in the story.

After Shared Reading with Children

For children with experience visiting a beach, books can be a way of remembering activities. Their prior knowledge with a real beach can enhance discussions on pictures and activities in the books. Use your child’s experience on a beach to compare what is the same and what is different between what they remember and what is shown in the book.

Keep the concepts about beaches and oceans at the forefront of your child’s memories. Reread your child’s favorite book. Then add on other books or experiences to keep the theme going — create crafts/art projects with sand, sea shells, or photos. Create a small scrapbook with mementos to help your child remember their trip to the beach.

Booklist: Beach Reads for Kids, Shared Reading with Children

Nostalgic Beach Reads

The first few books on the list are old fashioned picture books with a beach theme. Parents and grandparents may remember these books from their childhoods. Establish a tradition — now’s the time for the next generation to share in the reading experience.

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Just Grandma & Me, words and pictures by Mercer Mayer is a picture book for preschoolers,  ages 2-5. Little Critter, goes to the beach with his grandma – a happy day, a few small adventures, and a delightful relationship. Young parents may remember having this book read to them when they were preschoolers.

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Margaret Wise Brown’s The Little Island, Leo Lionni’s On My Beach There are Many Pebbles, and Kathy Jackson’s A Day at the Seashore are nostalgic picture books. Some grandparents of young children may have had these titles read to them the first time they went to the beach. These books are great before a short nap under a beach umbrella or after a day in the sun. The retro colors of the pictures are soothing and calming after bright sunlight and exuberant colors found at a day at the beach.

 

Baby & Toddler Board Book Beach Reads

Sturdy board books to share with your baby or toddler at the beach.

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Neil Gaiman & Adam Rex’s Chu’s Day at the Beach.  Follow Chu’s fun and frolic at the beach.

Karen Katz’s Where’s Baby’s Beach Ball has lift the flaps for babies to explore.

Adam Gamble’s & Cooper Kelly’s Good Night Beach. A great way to end your day at the beach is to transition to your night time routine. Read a about a family watching sunset on the beach.

 

Favorite Characters for Preschooler Beach Reads

Preschoolers enjoy sharing books with favorite characters.  It provides them with a sense of familiarity and stability. Preschoolers will also enjoy that the characters in the book do the same things at the beach that they do, such as play in the sand and play in the water.

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In Daniel’s Day at the Beach, Daniel Tiger goes to the beach with his family and friends from PBS’ Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood. Toddlers who enjoy learning social skills from this show will recognize the play and learn format from the videos.

Biscuit’s First Beach Day— words by Alyssa Satin Capucilli, pictures by Pat Schories, will be familiar to preschoolers and early readers who have shared reading experience with any of the other Biscuit adventure book.

In Amy Slansky’s These Little Piggies Go to the Beach the piggies from the childhood finger play “This Little Piggie ____” star in this picture book.  With naked toes at the beach this book will be a happy break from playing in the sand.

 

Beautiful Books for Beach Reads

The following books have gorgeous pictures. Children of all ages will appreciate the artwork when they need a bit of break or  quiet time on the beach.

 

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David Wiesner’s Floatsam is a Caldecott medal, wordless picture book. The pictures tell a complicated story of a boy finding a camera on a beach and discovers the camera has recorded its travels around the world and deep under the ocean.

Suzy Lee’s Waveis another wordless picture book. The pictures show the story of a little girl be friending and playing with an ocean wave at the beach. Similar to the opening scene of Disney’s Moana.

Faith Ringgold’s Tar Beach is also a Caldecott winner. This picture book shares the story of a city family spending time together on the roof top of their apartment building, pretending that it is their tar beach.

 

Science Beach Reads for Learning and Doing

For elementary aged children, here’s a pair of science themed books for the beach.

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The Magic School Bus on the Ocean Floor, the words are by Joanna Cole and the pictures by Bruce Degan. Teacher extraordinaire, Ms Frizzle takes her class on a field trip to the beach which of course turns into an exploration on the Ocean floor.

Lessons from the Sand: Family-Friendly Science Activities You Can Do on a Carolina Beach (Southern Gateways Guides) — combines science and science activities for families to enjoy together while visiting a beach.

 

Beach Read Explorations

Sand, rocks, surf, and tidal pools – beaches are great places to explore. Discover a little more territory with the following adventures.

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In Frane Lessac’s My Little Island, a boy explores a Caribbean island with his friend.

Scott O’Dell won the Newbery award for Island of the Blue Dolphins. In the novel, Karana, a native American girl, survives and thrives on an island all by herself for 18 years. An exciting read for children ages 7 – 10 or grades 2 – 5.

Booklist: Beach Reads for Kids, Shared Reading with Children

Booklist: LOL Books to Laugh Out Loud with Your Children

Booklist: LOL Books to Laugh Out Loud with Your Children

The day before I went to see the grandgirls, I was in the bookstore and saw a picture book with a funny cover that was on sale. Of course, I just had to buy it!

It was one of the best things I have ever bought in my life.  I was on the second or third re-read of Mother Bruce with granddaughter #1 , who is currently age 2, when my son sat down near us.  He chuckled along, then laughed out loud when we got to the page “He liked to support local business, you see.” My daughter in-law came into the room when we got to the section “Bruce was very stern and said things like ‘Go away!’ And ‘I am not your mother!’ And also ‘I liked you better when you were eggs’” and she blurted out “What are you reading?” with the most incredulous look on her face that my son and I broke out in chuckles; context is everything. Granddaugher #1, of course, was not impressed that there was an interruption to her story time.  That weekend we read Mother Bruce at least a half dozen more times. Since then, my husband has taken the book into work to show his colleague who also has grandchildren, who also loved it. Spread the joy, spread the laughter!

Laughing out loud with your kids is a good thing. Research shows that laughter and humor connects with cognitive and language development as well as positive social/emotional growth.  

In order to get a joke or see something as humorous, a person has to have an understanding of cause and effect. More complicated forms of humor require abstract thinking with an ability to use symbols or substitutions of one thing for another or knowing when one thing does not belong within a set (as the old Sesame Street song goes “one of these things is not like the other…). Laughter is a solid way of knowing that your child has a growing awareness of situations around them and can perform simple analysis by categorizing a scenario as funny. So, reading and laughing with your child is time to be enjoyed and encouraged.

Before Shared Reading

When you introduce the book, note the title, author, illustrator, and say that this should be a fun story or funny book. Comment on any cover art that gives clues on story plot or what your child might find funny.

During Shared Reading

Point out plot points, phrases, or illustrations that provide humor clues by noting that something is silly or funny. Note expressions on characters’ faces that show how they feel and ask your child to describe those feelings.

After Shared Reading

Ask your child what they thought was the funniest parts of the story or pictures and what makes those pieces funny. During re-reads build vocabulary by labeling those funny parts as silly, ridiculous, quirky, witty, amusing or droll as alternative words for funny. For older children try some symbolic substitution, would they still think the scene was funny if it happened to them.

 

Booklist: LOL Laugh Out Loud Books for Infants and Toddlers

Blue Hat, Green Hat

Words and Pictures by Sandra Boynton

Board Book Ages Infants & Toddlers

Turkey makes this introduction to colors and getting dressed an adventure with his silly antics. Also, purple socks!

Don’t Let Pigeon Drive the Bus

Words and Pictures by Mo Willems

Picture Book, First in a Series Ages 2 – 6

Caldecott Honor Book

Pigeon tries to beg and whine his way with the reader, but the bus driver said, “Don’t let Pigeon Drive the Bus!” Son #3 adored Pigeon (perhaps because they were so alike?) Will be a family favorite! Also see Mo Willems’ Knuffle Bunny trilogy.

For more LOL Books for infants and toddlers see Author Spotlight: Sandra Boynton

Booklist: LOL Laugh Out Loud Picture Books for Shared Reading with Children

Mother Bruce

Words and Pictures by Ryan T. Higgins

Picture Book Ages 4 – 8

E. B. White Read Aloud Winner and Ezra Jack Keats Book Award, New Illustration Honor

Bruce, a solitary and grumpy bear, is faced with hard work and challenging choices when a case of mistaken identity turns his fancy breakfast into gosling fosterlings. What’s a bear to do when his geese won’t migrate?

Bob, Not Bob “To Be Read as Though You Have the Worst Cold Ever”

Words by Liz Garton Scanlon and Audrey Vernick

Pictures by Matt Cordell

Picture Book Ages 4 – 8

We’ve all been there, when you have a cold you sound like a muppet. This books plays on  the frustration of trying to pronounce your words correctly with a stuffy nose, but it’s all ok when you have a Bob (pet dog) and a not Bob (mom) to help you when you feel sick. Remember as the cover states this book is “to be read as though you have the worst cold ever.”

I am Not a Chair

Words and Pictures by Ross Burach

Picture Book, Ages 4 – 8

A twist on the typical first day of school story, here is Giraffe’s first day in the jungle.  Why does everyone think he’s a chair? How is Giraffe going to clear up this confusion?

Muddle and Mo

Words and Pictures by Nikki Slade Robinson

Picture Book Ages 4 – 8

Muddle the duck and Mo the goat are both friends.  Mo helps Muddle figure out their differences when Muddle doesn’t understand that Mo is not a duck too.

Guess Again

Words by Mac Barnett, Pictures by Adam Rex

Picture Book Ages 4 – 8

Expect the unexpected, this is not your typical guessing game. Each rhyming riddle sets the reader to guess the answer, but the illustrations provide a misleading clue to a totally random and clever reveal.

Is Everyone Ready for Fun

Words and Pictures by Jan Thomas

Picture Book Ages 3 – 8

Three cows invade chicken’s sofa with jumping, dancing and wiggling.  Kids will want to join the cows in their fun and pretend to be cows too,  while the grown-up reader came sympathize and give voice to the exasperated chicken.; an easy book to dramatize while reading.

That’s Not a Hippopotamus

Words by Juliette MacIver

Pictures by Sarah Davis

Picture Books Ages 4 – 8

A class field trips gets turned upside down, when the hippopotamus goes missing.

Booklist: LOL Laugh and Read Aloud Chapter Books for Elementary and Middle Schoolers

Fortunately the Milk

Neil Gaiman

Similar to the escalating hilarity found in Dr Seuss’ And to Think I Saw It on Mulberry Street, this story builds as a dad explains to his kids in great zany detail, why it took him so long to fetch some milk for the breakfast cereal. The ultimate book to showcase “Dad Humor” with this dad’s improbable adventures.

8 Class Pets + 1 Squirrel + 1 Dog = Chaos

Vivian Vande Velde

Twitch the squirrel get chased into the school by Cuddles the principal’s dog, now the school pets are on a rescue mission to save Twitch.

I, Funny: A Middle School Story

James Patterson and Chris Grabenstein

Part 1 of a Series

Jamie Grimm is on a quest to become a comedian and entering The Planet’s Funniest Kid Comic is a step towards his goal; but his journey is filled with both comedy and drama, because hey, this is a middle school story.

Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch

Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett

The world is suppose to end on Saturday, but where is the Antichrist? A bookish angel and a demon with car issues team up to save the planet.

The Princess Bride: S. Morgenstern’s Classic Tale of True Love and High Adventure

William Goldman

The title says it all and the 1987 PG movie adaptation is a rare gem since it is just as good maybe even better than the book, both are classics.

Mort

Terry Pratchett

Mort, slightly inept but with a good heart, becomes the apprentice to Death, yes, that Death, the one with the horse and scythe. A great introduction to the madcap and marvelous Discworld series.

 

Recommend your favorite LOL funny books here