Booklist: If You Like Peter Rabbit… Bunny Books for Shared Reading with Children

If You Like Peter Rabbit…

Booklist: Bunny Books for Shared Reading with Children

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When I first heard of the 2018 live action movie of Peter Rabbit, I must admit to being worried, because I adore Beatrix Potter’s detailed and delightful watercolor illustrations. Peter Rabbit, himself is also an irrepressible trickster with that balance of naughty and nice that makes him so lovable. Of course, ending one’s adventures or rather misadventures with a soothing cup of chamomile tea is a perfect precedent to continue.  Whatever your thoughts on the movie, take time to read the original inspiration as well as some of Miss Potter’s other works.

 

For more about the author/illustrator Beatrix Potter see the 2006 PG movie Miss Potter https://www.commonsensemedia.org/movie-reviews/miss-potter

 

Before Shared Reading: Establish a Reading Routine

A reading routine can be soothing for children and help them focus on the story. Examples of routines include time and place of shared reading – before bedtime and in bed or a comfy chair. Include in your routine a way to introduce the book which includes highlighting the title, author, illustrator, and some story clues (blurbs from the back or dust cover flaps of books). This routine will help your child by building anticipation as well as listening skills.

 

During Shared Reading

Make the reading relevant to your child, by pointing specific character traits and behaviors. The lead characters in this booklist are all rabbits that act like people in both positive and negative ways. In folklore, rabbits often take on the role of the trickster, a clever character who can circumvent typical behaviors for their own positive outcome, for example, Uncle Remus’ Brer Rabbit or even Bugs Bunny. While reading, highlight naughty or nice behaviors that fits the rabbit  in the story into the trickster role.

 

After Shared Reading

Children often enjoy characters that they can relate to, even if they are being naughty, such as Mo Willem’s Pigeon who whines and wheedles in order to get his way. Talk about what your child likes or doesn’t like about the behaviors of the rabbit character. Are they relevant to your child? Is the rabbit a good or bad model of behavior? Would they want to be friends with a person or character with similar behaviors.

 

Depending on the dialog and action, use homemade (finger, stick, or sock) puppets or even stuffed plush toys to dramatize favorite scenes from the books. Reenacting the story plot helps build reading comprehension skills.

 

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If You Like Peter Rabbit…

Booklist: Bunny Books for Shared Reading with Children

 

White Rabbit’s Color Book

Words and Pictures by Alan Baker

Board Books Infants and Toddlers

White rabbit experiments with the paint pots and has a colorful adventure. If you find a paperback or hardback edition read that edition as the detailed full page spreads are easier to view. Also see by the same author/illustrator, Black and White Rabbit’s ABC

 

Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present

Words by Charlotte Zolotow

Pictures by Maurice Sendak

Caldecott Honor Book

Mr Rabbit helps a little girl find a present for her mother who loves colorful things.

 

If You Plant a Seed

Words and Pictures by Kadir Nelson

Picture Book Ages 4 – 8

Rabbit and mouse plant a garden and wait patiently for harvest, however, when it’s time to gather their carrots and cabbages unexpected visitors arrive. Gorgeous paintings by an award winner illustrator paired with a lovely story about friendship and cooperation.

 

Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale

 

Knuffle Bunny Too: A Case of Mistaken Identity

Knuffle Bunny Free: An Unexpected Diversion

Words and Pictures by Mo Willems

Picture Books Ages 2 – 6

Knuffle Bunny Caldecott Medal

The adventures of Trixie and her cuddle buddy, Knuffle Bunny, from toddlerhood through preschool years will delight your family. Include The Velveteen Rabbit, words by Margery Williams and pictures by William Nicholson, during a reading session to extend the theme of rabbit shaped toy friends.

 

Bunny Cakes

Words and Pictures by Rosemary Wells

Picture Book Ages 2- 6 Part of the Max and Ruby series

Max wants to make grandma a cake with worms, but bossy Ruby wants to make an angel cake with icing. Which sibling will be in charge of the baking in the kitchen?

 

The Little Rabbit Who Lost Her Hop

Words and Pictures by Jedda Robaard

Board Book Ages 2 – 4

On the way to a party, little rabbit loses her hop – how will she get to her family’s celebration? Let children lift the flaps to see how she will get to the party on time.

 

Watership Down

Richard Addams

Fiction Fantasy

The classic tale of rabbits in search of a new home due to building on their former field. This would also be a good audiobook to listen to on a road trip. You might want to introduce younger children to the plot by viewing the animated adaptation from 1978, for more on the movie, see  https://www.commonsensemedia.org/movie-reviews/watership-down 

 

 

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The Tale of Hill Top Farm

Susan Wittig Albert

First in the Cottage Tales of Beatrix Potter series

Fiction Cozy Mystery/Fantasy

Including real people and locations, this cozy mystery series brings a lighthearted look at the complexity of village life including the point of view and side stories of the animal inhabitants. Grown-up fiction which is approachable for older elementary and middle school readers.

 

So, what do you think? Peter Rabbit — movie or book? Share your thoughts below.

 

Quote: Never trust anyone who has not brought a book. Lemony Snicket

Quote: Never trust anyone who has not brought a book. Lemony Snicket

Never trust anyone who has not brought a book. Lemony Snicket, Horshradish
Never trust anyone who has not brought a book. Lemony Snicket, Horseradish Quote

Quote: Never trust anyone who has not brought a book. Lemony Snicket

Also see

Booklist: LOL Books to Laugh Out Loud with Your Children

Booklist about Books for Shared Reading with Children

Share your favorite book or reading quote here.

Quote: Sleep is good, he said, and books are better. George R. R. Martin

Quote: Sleep is good, he said, and books are better. George R. R. Martin

Sleep is goo he said, and books are better
George R. R. Martin Quote

Quote: Sleep is good, he said, and books are better. George R. R. Martin

For more on George R. R. Martin see

http://www.georgerrmartin.com/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_R._R._Martin

Share your favorite book or reading quote here.

Quote: You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough…C.S.Lewis

Quote: You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me. C.S. Lewis

You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me. C.S. Lewis
C.S. Lewis Quote

Quote C. S. Lewis, You can never get a cup of tea large enough or a book long enough to suit me.

For more on C. S. Lewis see

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C._S._Lewis

http://www.cslewis.org/

 

Share your favorite book or reading quote here.

Quote: Sometimes, you read a book…John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

Quote: Sometimes, you read a book…John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

Quote: Sometimes, you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book. John Green, The Fault in Our Stars
Quote: John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

Quote: Sometimes, you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book. John Green, The Fault in Our Stars

Share your favorite book or reading quote here.

Quote: Neil Gaiman on Books and Reading

Quote: Neil Gaiman on Books and Reading

The simplest way to make sure that we raise literate children is...to show them that reading is a pleasureable activity. and that means finding books that they enjoy, giving them access to those books, and letting them read them. Neil Gaiman
Neil Gaiman quote on books and reading:

“The simplest way to make sure that we raise literate children is…to show them that reading is a pleasurable activity. And that means finding books that they enjoy, giving them access to those books, and letting them read them.”

— Neil Gaiman

Also see

Booklist about Books for Shared Reading with Children

Booklist: LOL Books to Laugh Out Loud with Your Children

Share your favorite book or reading quote here.

Author Spotlight: Sandra Boynton!

Author Spotlight: Sandra Boynton

April 3, Happy Birthday, Sandra Boynton!

 

Sandra Boynton’s board books were some of the first books my boys looked at, teethed on, played with, and listened to during shared reading times as babies and toddlers; and my granddaughters are carrying on the tradition. Her books are engaging, whimsical, and clever — a delight for children and their grown-ups.

 

Before Reading: Set the Stage

Hold your baby on your lap when your baby is calm; get cozy and cuddly so your baby can see the pictures. Remember proximity is important during shared reading it fosters a positive experience.  

 

During Reading: Capture Interest

Engage your baby’s attention, if it looks like your baby’s attention is drifting — tap on the book with your finger and comment on the words and pictures. Also, encourage your toddler to help you turn the board book’s pages for simple engagement. Boynton’s creatures have expressive faces, try to copy those faces and adjust your voice to show the emotion.

 

After Reading: Encourage Play

Board books are sturdy.  Let your baby hold and manipulate the pages, in order to get used to the open/shut motion of the pages. Extend that practice to other objects with hinges, such as old CD/DVD cases, to further exercise their hand-eye coordination.

 

Five Favorite Sandra Boynton Books

 

Doggies (Boynton on Board)

All kinds of doggies, and just when you think you know what to expect there’s an amazing plot twist — surprise!

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The Going to Bed Book

All the animals on the ark get ready for bed and so should the readers. A lovely way to review common bedtime routines.

 

Barnyard Dance

Classic board book fun for everyone. Encourage  your toddler to move around like the animals.

Moo Baa La La La

Another classic baby board book. Have fun making all of the animal noises and get your child to do the same.

Fuzzy, Fuzzy, Fuzzy!

The cute critters of Boynton plus a variety of textures to feel on the pages make this book extra interactive for the littlest ones. Also, this is a Pennsylvania Center for the Book recommendation for family literacy books.

OK, I fibbed, have to include Blue Hat, Green Hat because the turkey is too funny. I always cheer for the underdog, even when he is a turkey. I can read this book a dozen times in a row (yup, I have) and still chuckle in the right spots.

If you like this post you will like

Booklist LOL: Books to Laugh Out Loud with Your Children

April 3, Happy Birthday, Sandra Boynton!

To find out more about author & illustrator Sandra Boynton check out her website http://www.sandraboynton.com/sboynton/index.html

Share a birthday greeting (but skip the monsters) via Twitter @SandyBoynton

 

Booklist: Worms on the Sidewalk, Books for Shared Reading

Booklist: Worms on the Sidewalk, Books for Shared Reading

Ground Hog Day’s Punxsutawney Phil may get the notoriety for heralding the onset of spring, but to me the surest sign of spring is worms on the sidewalk.  My mother is a gardener, so I grew up respecting worms and using gardening gloves to move them from the sidewalk to soil.

My favorite worm book is Diary of a Worm by Doreen Cronin with pictures by Harry Bliss. This book inspired son #2’s summer project of a DIY worm composting bin. Due to only having a small patio, we couldn’t winterize the worms and set them free in the fall in time for their dormant stage. The azalea bush is still grateful. When granddaughter #1 is ready, I will probably pair that book reading with the nonfiction book We Dig Worms! — words and pictures by Kevin McCloskey — because they share the same cartoon style illustrations. Bonus: both authors are from Pennsylvania where we live.

 

Before Shared Reading: Set the Stage

Select a good time, these books are perfect to read during a rainy day.  Get comfortable and cozy; proximity is important because in a shared reading experience you want everyone to be able to see all the pictures and the words. The book should be within reaching distance so your child can help turn the pages (when appropriate by skill and age).

Point out the names of the author and illustrator on the book cover. This will build the concept that books are created by people and will subtly reinforce your own child’s agency in creating pictures and stories.

 

During Shared Reading: Be Dramatic and Go for an Encore

It’s time to let your inner Oscar, Emmy, Tony or Golden Globe out. Use funny voices and encourage your child to add in sound effects.

During the first couple of read throughs you might want to stick to the main text. For repeated readings take time to explore the dialog balloons or side text boxes; move your along the words to show that you where your are on the page. Ask questions (who, what, where, why, & how) to check your child’s comprehension for the plot and character or factual information.

 

After Shared Reading: Engage in Activities

Find a few worms to observe in a jar with local soil (potting soil may not have enough compost nutrients for them) for a couple of days. Feed them small bits of compost material (for example: leftover vegetable leaves) and lightly spray the soil with water.  Also, make a wrap around sleeve of cardboard for darkness when you aren’t observing them. (See the nonfiction books on earthworms, they don’t have eyes but do have light sensitive cell receptors) Like a any good scientist, encourage your child to take dated field notes (pictures, dictation, bullet points) or like the worm in the book keep a diary for the time you have your wormy guests. Besides observing them, there are a few experiments you can try with your worms. For example, while on a tray place the worm in front of wet paper towel and a dry paper towel, in which direction will your worm move? After a few days, do the capture/release or search & rescue (if you saved them from a wet sidewalk) and set them free because the earth needs worms in the environment.

 

Booklist: Worms on the Sidewalk, Books for Shared Reading

Diary of a Worm

Words by Doreen Cronin and Pictures by Harry Bliss

Picture Book Fiction Ages 4 – 8

With humor and clever cartoons, this book takes you through the day to day life of a young worm. There is also an easy reader spin-off in the I Can Read series that extends your stay in this setting as well as a companion picture book Diary of a Spider.

 

 

Best Lowly Worm Book Ever!

Words and Pictures by Richard Scarry

Picture Book Fiction Ages 3 – 7

Nostalgia for grown-ups and new adventures for children, readers follow Lowly Worm as he rides around in his apple car on a busy day. Plenty of details in the pictures will keep children engaged during re-reads. Huck Scarry completed the book making process for his dad.

 

How to Eat Fried Worms

Thomas Rockwell

Chapter Book Ages 8 – 12

Two boys make a bet that forces one of them to eat a worm each day for 15 days in a row. Lots of dialog makes for a great read aloud. There is a 2006 movie adaptation with a PG rating, for more on the movie see https://www.commonsensemedia.org/movie-reviews/how-to-eat-fried-worms

It’s a Good Thing There Are Earthworms

Words by Jodie Shepherd

Illustrated Book Nonfiction Ages 4 – 8

Basic introduction to earthworms with photographs for up close illustrations.  Also see similar photographic works: Earthworms, by Lisa J. Amstutz; Earthworms, by Nikki Bruno Clapper; Earthworms, by Claire Llewellyn and Barry Watts.

 

Snail and Worm Again!

Words and Pictures by Tina Kügler

Picture Book Fiction Ages 4 – 9

Geisel Honor Winner

Snail and Worm are friends, share three stories about their friendship. The mini-chapters can be read by new readers on their own. There is a previous work with the same duo, Snail & Worm. Also see, Wiggle and Waggle, a beginner chapter book by Caroline Arnold that features the friendship between two worms.

 

The Story of Silk: From Worm Spit to Woven Scarves

Words and Photography by Richard Sobol

Picture Book Nonfiction Ages 6 – 9

The author/photographer shares his trip to a village in Thailand, where all the town’s people including the children work together to produce cloth from silk worms.  Pair this travel story with How to Eat Fried Worms, because there is a photograph of villagers eating boiled silkworms with their lunch, nothing gets wasted in this culture.

 

 

We Dig Worms!

Words and Pictures by Kevin McCloskey

Graphic Novel Nonfiction Ages 5 – 7

School Library Journal’s Top 10 Graphic Novels 2015

Shares facts about worms with a focus on how earthworms aid in plant growth with their tunnels and castings. In the back of the book, the author shares great tips on how to read comics with kids.

 

Wiggling Worms at Work

Words by Wendy Pfeffer 

Pictures by Steve Jenkins

Picture Book Nonfiction Ages 4 – 8

Basic presentation of a worm life cycle and facts with interesting torn paper collage illustrations. Back of the book suggests experiments for observing worms in their environment. For a similar book, see Garden Wigglers: Earthworms in Your Backyard; Words by Nancy Loewen and Pictures by Rick Peterson (Picture Book Nonfiction Ages 4-8)

 

Winnie Finn, Worm Farmer

Words by Carol Brendler

Pictures by Ard Hoyt

Picture Book Fiction Ages 4 – 8

Our spunky heroine, Winnie Finn is on a quest to enter her worm friends in the Quincy County Fair, even if there is no category for worms. See the back of the book for advice on starting a family worm farm.

 

The Worm (Disgusting Critters Series)

Words and Pictures by Elise Gravel

Picture Book Nonfiction, Part of a Series  Ages 6 – 9

With humor, a worm introduces himself to the readers, along with a variety of worm facts.  The cartoon illustrations will pair well in a read along with Diary of a Worm.

 

Worm Weather

Words by Jean Taft

Pictures by Matt Hunt

Picture Book Ages 3 – 5

In rhyming verse, two children play in rain as worms underground raise up to explore the wet ground.

 

Superworm

Words by Julia Donaldson and Pictures by Axel Scheffler

Picture Book Fiction Ages 4 – 8

Superworm saves his friends, the toads, the bees, and the beatles, however, when Superworm is caught by the wicked Lizard wizard, it’s time for Superworm’s friends to save him.

 

Yucky Worms

Words by Vivian French

Pictures by Jessica Ahlberg

Picture Book Fiction Ages 4 – 8

Bridges the gap between a fiction and nonfiction book. While gardening, a grandmother explains to her grandson the importance of worms, so this book provides an overview of worm facts within a gentle setting.

If you like this booklist, then see

Booklist: Spring Books for Shared Reading with Children

Recommend your favorite book with worms here